Connect with us

Yooka-Laylee releases in one week, and already the reviews are rolling in. Most of these reviews praise the game in one form or another, but some are more positive than others.

Many reviews state what most people assume: Yooka-Laylee successfully copies the look and sound of Banjo Kazooie. The game’s mechanics, however, are where opinions start to differ. The Guardian praises the variety of quests, missions, and puzzles players need to complete to collect Pagies, Yooka-Laylee’s Jiggies stand-in, while GameSpot is far more critical and claims some of these challenges are repetitive and simply not worth playing. Another divisive feature of the game is that players can choose how they progress;  Pagies can both unlock new worlds and expand existing ones. Destructoid loves this rather novel concept, but once again, GameSpot is slightly more negative, stating the feature is more tedious than anything else and doesn’t actually improve game worlds.

Polish is where Yooka-Laylee seems to suffer. Many, including independent Youtube channels such as ACG and GameXplain, cite camera and performance issues. And, some reviews are almost exclusively negative. For example, Jim Sterling thinks the game is absolutely horrendous, despite being impressed by the Kickstarter campaign and the demo.

The following are the scores given by the reviews mentioned in the article:

The Guardian: 4/5
“Younger players may be be less willing to forgive its anachronisms but for its target audience, those ageing mourners of a lost fashion in games, it’s a promise that’s proven worthy of backing.”

GameSpot: 6/10 (Fair)
“Ultimately, Yooka-Laylee’s best and worst aspects come directly from its predecessor. Despite attempts at modernizing the formula, its style of gameplay is still outdated, and it doesn’t stay challenging or interesting as a result.”

Destructoid: 8/10 (Great)
“Playtonic’s first foray is rough around the edges, but the center is so full of heart that it’ll melt away the more you play it. How much of that roughness you can put up with entirely depends on your history and mental fortitude for mascot platformers.”

ACG: Wait for a Sale (The channel does not give numerical scores)
“There’s a lot to like here from the strange puzzling way the game’s levels sort of intertwined to the moments when a jump and a roll attack work just right. But, in the end, even at the $39,99 asking price, I think the game’s real lack of really enjoyable main characters, the camera issues, and some bugs hold this back.”

GameXplain: Liked (The channel does not give numerical scores)
“I know I’ve been pretty tough on Yooka-Laylee in this review, and make no mistake, the technical and performance problems in the Xbox One version are every bit as severe as I’ve made them out to be. But, just as importantly, I’ve enjoyed my time with the game moment to moment and the Banjo Kazooie fan in me is satisfied with Yooka-Laylee as a whole, technical problems be damned.”

Jim Sterling: 2/10 (Bad)
“Yooka-Laylee is a game out of time, clinging so desperately to past glories it doesn’t seem to understand the Earth kept spinning after the N64 was discontinued. It’s everything wrong about the formative years of 3D platforming and it somehow retained none of what made the genre’s highlights endure.”

Most reviewers adore Yooka-Laylee and are willing to overlook the game’s shortcomings, although how much of that is due to nostalgia goggles is anyone’s guess. People whose interests are piqued by the reviews will have to wait until April 11th when the game launches on PC, Xbox One, and PlayStation 4. Sorry Nintendo Switch owners, you will need to wait a little longer.

All you have to do to get my attention is talk about video games, technology, anime, and/or Dungeons & Dragons - also people in spandex fighting rubber suited monsters.

Gaming

Call of Duty: Black Ops 6 Sets Dates for the Next Multiplayer Beta

blank

Published

on

blank

Call of Duty: Black Ops 6 is getting closer and closer, and Activision has announced when players will be able to get their hands on the next game. This means that there will be several chances to try it out before it comes out. If you paid a lot, you might be able to play for more than a week at the end of August and beginning of September.

Call of Duty Early Access will run from Friday, August 30th, to Wednesday, September 4th, as announced on its blog. This is two days after the Call of Duty Next showcase, which is set for August 28th. To play, you must have already bought Black Ops 6.

The open beta is the following weekend, and anyone who wants to can join. The fun will start on Friday, September 6th, and end on Monday, September 9th. The full release is set for October 25th of next month on PS5 and PS4.

How excited are you for the next Call of Duty game? Are you going to play Black Ops 6 in either the Early Access or Open Beta versions? Leave a comment below and let us know.

 

Continue Reading

Gaming

Ten million people play The First Descendant in its first week

blank

Published

on

blank

The free-to-play shooter The First Descendant has gotten a lot of attention in its first week. The game’s publisher, Nexon, says that 10 million people have already tried it out.

Insider Gaming pointed out that since there is no cost up front, it’s still too early to tell how many of those players will stick around, but it’s still a big number for a new IP. On Steam alone, it peaked at 264,860 concurrents right after launch and has still managed to break 200,000 in the last 24 hours, so it looks like a lot of people are still really into the game.

It was a “mindless and repetitive grind,” and we gave The First Descendant a 3/10 in our review. Of course, that’s just one opinion; other experts have had different ones. Most people, though, say that the game’s annoying free-to-play model is the worst thing about it.

Are you one of the millions of people who played The First Descendant last week? Are you going to come back for more? Leave a comment below and let us know.

 

Continue Reading

Gaming

Raiden, the famous shmup series, will come back as a twin-stick shooter on PS5, PS4, and PC

blank

Published

on

blank

Raiden has a long and interesting history as a vertical shooter in arcades. However, the series is going to get a Super Stardust HD makeover, which means it will switch to a twin-stick format. It comes out in Japan on October 31. There’s no word yet on when it will come out in the West, but we wouldn’t be surprised if it did.

A Gematsu translation of the game’s website says that the full version will have an arcade mode with up to six stages. There will also be an “Unlimited” option for people who want to be at the top of the rankings. It sounds like a pretty straightforward package in terms of what’s inside, but we think the action will be what makes it worth it.

There’s a trailer up top that should help you figure out what to expect. There are, however, different versions of Raiden 3, Raiden 4, and Raiden 5 that you can play right now on the PS5 and PS4, if you can’t wait for this game to come out in the West.

Continue Reading

Trending