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Space glass – a 3D printed glass designed for Whiskey

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I don’t know about you, but enjoying a glass of whisky on a spaceship somewhere near the moon while listening to Pink Floyd and watching the world spin endlessly is by far one of my most wanted dreams. It seems that the alcohol company Ballantine’s has a similar aspiration and has started doing something about it.

Firstly, they sent a bottle of raw malt whisky into space and back to check what effects zero gravity has on its taste. Apparently, the sample had an aftertaste described to be “intense and long, with hints of wood, antiseptic lozenges and rubbery smoke”. Ballantine’s wants to produce a new brand of whisky called “Space Whisky” that will taste like a mix between honey, vanilla, clementine oranges, Barley sugar sweets and a hint of liquorice spice.  After studying the effects of zero gravity on flavor, researchers from the Scottish distillery Ardbeg are working on their Space Whisky.
In parallel, the company has worked on another project, to create a “space glass” that can be used in space. The glass is designed with a metal base and a plastic top that has a mouthpiece. The space glass will keep the liquid at the bottom and while you roll the whisky in your hand, heat will be transferred trough the metal base, which will vaporize the alcohol. All is left is to sip it through the mouthpiece. The space glass has already been 3D-printed and is to be tested in actual space, hopefully with an unaltered whisky.

The glass will most likely not be sent soon into space because astronauts from the International Space Station (ISS) don’t drink. But, by all means, it is a very useful marketing technique that Ballantine’s is using, making a space glass to drink space whisky.

Who doesn’t enjoy listening to a good story. Personally I love reading about the people who inspire me and what it took for them to achieve their success. As I am a bit of a self confessed tech geek I think there is no better way to discover these stories than by reading every day some articles or the newspaper . My bookcases are filled with good tech biographies, they remind me that anyone can be a success. So even if you come from an underprivileged part of society or you aren’t the smartest person in the room we all have a chance to reach the top. The same message shines in my beliefs. All it takes to succeed is a good idea, a little risk and a lot of hard work and any geek can become a success. VENI VIDI VICI .

Science

NASA Tells Us About The “Daylight Fireball” Over New York

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There were reports of a “daylight fireball” flying over the Statue of Liberty in New York, USA. NASA has now come forward to explain what it was.

Between 11:16 and 11:30 a.m. on Tuesday, people in New York said they saw a big fireball and heard a loud boom.

For example, someone driving on Route 100 said, “All of a sudden, I saw this bright, white, and kind of burning at one end bundle streak through the sky from left to right, going down very quickly.” “I have never seen anything like this before.”

The American Meteor Society got a lot of reports about the object. Based on these reports, NASA was able to get a rough idea of its path, which changed as more reports came in.

As NASA’s Meteor Watch said in a Facebook post, “more eyewitness reports have been posted—we have double what we had before, and the additions have made a big difference in the trajectory.” “Right now, the meteor is coming from above New York City and going west into New Jersey.” A little faster now, going 38,000 miles per hour (61,155 km/h).

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People who commented were surprised that a meteor could have hit without NASA being aware of it. However, smaller objects like this do hit the Earth’s atmosphere pretty often. Every day, about 44,000 kilograms (97,000 pounds) of meteoric material are thought to fall to Earth.

“A lot of people think that NASA keeps an eye on everything in space,” NASA’s Meteor Watch went on. “We do keep an eye on asteroids that could hurt people on Earth, but small rocks like the one that’s making this fireball are only about a foot (0.3 meters) across and can’t make it all the way to the ground.” We can’t keep track of things this small when they are very far away from Earth. The only time we hear about them is when they hit the atmosphere and turn into a meteor or fireball.

NASA keeps track of the big things that come close, but every night, a lot of smaller meteors can be seen in an hour. Likely, this one was a bolide, which is a bigger meteor that broke up when it hit the friction of our atmosphere. Bolides are very bright meteors that can be seen during the day. They are usually too small to make it to the ground, so they explode when they hit the atmosphere.

It’s nothing to worry about, even though we didn’t see it coming. That we can reconstruct its path from what people saw is cool too.

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Astronomy

It may not be long before we find “Earth’s Twin”

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To figure out if there is life in other parts of the universe, we start with Earth, where there is life now. Finding another Earth is a good way to find aliens. We have found more than 5,000 exoplanets, but we haven’t found Earth’s twin yet. This could change soon, though. Here comes the PLATO mission from the European Space Agency (ESA).

What does PLATO stand for? It stands for PLAnetary Transits and Oscillations of stars. Its goal is very clear. It will look for nearby stars like the Sun that might have habitable worlds like Earth.

“One of the main goals is to find a way to compare Earth and the Sun.” The size of Earth is in the habitable zone of a star like the Sun. “We want to find it around a star that’s bright enough that we can really figure out how heavy it is and how big it is,” Dr. David Brown from the University of Warwick told IFLScience. “If you like, that’s our main goal.”

The telescope is not only an observatory for looking for planets, but it is also an observatory for collecting data on a huge number of stars. The mission team thinks that the fact that it can do both is a key part of why this telescope will be so important.

“You have two parts of the mission.” One is exoplanets, and the other is the stars. “From a scientific point of view, I think it’s pretty cool that these two parts are working together to make the best science we can,” Dr. Brown said.

One of the secondary goals is to make a list of all the planets that are Earth-like and all the star systems that are out there. One more goal is to find other solar systems that are like ours. Even though we don’t know for sure if our little part of the universe is truly unique, it does seem to be different from everything else.

Dr. Brown told IFLScience, “We have a bunch of other scientific goals.” “Really, how well do we know how planetary systems change and grow over time?” Planetary systems are something we’re trying to understand as a whole, not just one planet at a time.

PLATO is different in more ways than just the goals. It is not just one telescope. In fact, it’s made up of 26 different ones. Two of the cameras are fast, and the other 24 are normal cameras set up in groups of six with a small gap between them. This makes the telescope work better, has a wider field of view, and lets you quickly rule out false positives.

It can be hard to tell which of the things you find when you transit exoplanets are real and which ones are not. With the help of several telescopes, we were able to block out some of the mimics that we would have seen otherwise. “Plus, it looks pretty cool,” Dr. Brown said with excitement. “This big square with all of these telescopes pointing at you looks really cool!”

This week, Dr. Brown gave an update on PLATO at the National Astronomy Meeting at the University of Hull. The telescope is being put together and has recently passed important tests. There are no changes to the planned launch date for December 2026. An Ariane 6 rocket, the same kind that made its first launch last week, will take off from French Guiana.

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Astronomy

You can watch and listen to gravitational waves coming from everywhere in the universe

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Gravitational waves can be turned into sound very easily. The little chirp changes into little sounds as soon as the blocks hit each other. One of those chirps is my ringtone when my phone has sound, which doesn’t happen very often. The people at Audio Universe have now made the gravitational wave data even better.

In a 3D video, the sounds of gravitational waves hit you from the direction in the sky where it is thought they came from. The sound effects and visualization are both great. There are tiny vibrations in space-time that can hit you as you move your mouse, phone, or VR headset.

Like other sonification projects, it gives blind and visually impaired people a way to get involved in astronomy. It works well with other methods like the Tactile Universe. But that’s not the only reason why they do it.

“We want to do this for three reasons.” It helps researchers look into big, complicated datasets with lots of dimensions. It could be used to make educational materials that are immersive and interesting. Rose Shepherd from Newcastle University says, “It can also make astronomy easier for more people to understand, which is an important thing.” “Making things easier to get makes them better for everyone.”

Being able to listen to the emission lines of celestial objects is one of the most interesting things about sonification for research. As an object moves, its light spectrum peaks spread out, and sonification can make something that is barely noticeable to the eye seem very clear to the ear.

This is helpful in more than one field, though. The group has thought about how adding sound to different datasets could make them better. Warming Stripes is a cool example of this. This is a simple image that shows changes in temperature over time by using a series of stripes, from blue to red. The stripes on the right side get redder as we move from the left to the right. The left side shows decades ago. It is great to see how the climate crisis is getting worse, and now sound adds a little more to it.

“By adding sounds, it can give your data an emotional meaning.” Shepherd explained, “You can use that to show the data how you feel.” “We didn’t mean for the Warming Stripes sonification to make people feel stressed, but it was interesting to see how they reacted instead of just watching the video.”

Audio Universe is making a sonic toolkit that many people can use to make their own resources.

She gave a talk about the audio universe at the National Astronomy Meeting at the University of Hull this week.

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