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Audvisor review: curated knowledge, anywhere, anytime

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Audvisor is one of those apps that doesn’t aim to be a hit because of a great design, or an innovative concept, but because of the ideal that it portrays. Audvisor is a very simple app, that lets you listen to motivational speeches. Although the cultural influence of motivational speakers has decreased in the past few years, Audvisor has a great shot at replacing it. We search for things to motivate us, get us out of a rut we’re in or give us some great new ideas on how to move forward in our business, our lives and so much more. While we can find the top ten reasons for starting a business, best new business strategies, tips to become a successful venture capitalist, how to get a startup off its feet, we many times omit that although advice such as this may be useful, we might not be motivated enough to take it into consideration.

Que Audvisor, an app that tackles all the searches mentioned above, and some more. With this app, available for Android and iOS (click to download), you can curate your own success story, in a way. Audvisor lets you learn from other people in a way that has been found to be most effective: by listening. The main principle behind Audvisor is to help people who are constantly moving, constantly on the run, always occupied with some task or another, focus and learn. Audvisor provides a list of speakers and a whole array of topics which you can browse so that you can find the perfect speech or story for when exercising, washing the dishes, commuting to work, doing all kinds of chores around the house, looking through galleries of pictures or any other activity that allows you to multitask effectively.

There are many Audvisor speakers to choose from

There are many Audvisor speakers to choose from

Audvisor promotes the accumulation of knowledge and insight in an easy way, that is suitable for most people with fast lifestyles. You can just start the app up, select a speaker or just let the app run you through the speeches it has available and go about your day. One thing that you might bring up: why not watch TED Talks on Youtube for that kind of information? Well, as most of your probably know, Youtube can’t run in the background when you’re doing other stuff on your smartphone or tablet or when you press the power button and put it in standby. Audvisor can do that for you, which means you can get uninterrupted insight about topics like: how to be happy, how to build a successful career, how to become an entrepreneur, investing in your people, starting a movement, building healthy relationships and more.

Audvisor lets you control your curated playlist of speeches right from your lockscreen, all the while displaying a photo and information about the speaker you are listening to, as well as info about the topic you’re listening to. Even if this small feature doesn’t seem like much, it makes a whole world of difference when talking about an audio app. You can also control the Audvisor player from the notifications panel of your phone, but even if you’re not using the app anymore, you’ve got a chance of it staying there until you kill the app. But that’s certainly not a deal-breaker, it’s more of a feature. I would like it if there were an exit button next to the controls in the notifications panel, so that I can easily let Audvisor know that I’m done listening.

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That’s Audvisor on my lockscreen, that’s Ted Rubin

The layout and design of the app is very basic and simple, not to mention easy to use. You’ve a deep blue theme all over, which is actually quite relaxing. I would like if Audvisor had a bit more color to it, but this simple design is as good as any other, because the app is not about staying within the app: it’s about forgetting you even have it and focusing on what the amazing speakers are telling you through your speakers or headphones. The in-app player is structured around cards that you can swipe away, thus activating the next card from the recommended playlist. You can also use share handles from Facebook and Twitter, but you can also send one of the talks that you liked through a text message to a friend, which can come in handy.

You can create your own playlist of talks and speeches within Audvisor, so that you can group your favorite speeches into categories. The speeches and talks themselves are organized into two main categories: Topics and Experts. In the Topics category, you can easily find the content that is most interesting to you, and the advice that you most need at one point or another. An example of topics that you might want to check out on Audvisor would be how to get a great job, or how to advance your career and even advice on how to become a better person. You name it, Audvisor has a talk on it. In the Experts category, you will find all the speakers whose motivational speeches and talks can be found within the app, in case you have a favorite, such as Ted Rubin, Guy Kawasaki, Seth Godin, Tom Peters, Pamela Slim, Stephen Shapiro and many more. You can find out information about each experts by tapping on one of their speeches and then on their name, if you’re curious.

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There are many topics in Audvisor to choose from

The talks themselves are msotly high-quality audio, as Audvisor prides itself with that. Certainly, there are some talks that are ripped from video conferences and some talks have a bit of noise, but every single one is a decent experience, without an exception. There are some speeches that aren’t perfect on speaker, but if you slap some headphones on, you’ll have no problems understanding what the speaker is saying to you. If you don’t have time to browse around so many talks, you can always go to the top rated content, recommended content, your own playlists or check out the newest added talks on Audvisor.

If you go to the Menu, besides having access to all the topics and experts featured on Audvisor, you can also access connection options and a play in background toggle. You don’t have many connectivity options, but you have the most important ones: Twitter and Facebook. You can also create your own account, which is helpful if you want to create your own playlists and share your favorite speeches. There aren’t millions of speeches that you can listen to, but there might be in the future, as Audvisor is growing over time. The talks range from a minute or two to about 5 minutes, but you can’t sort by length just yet. That would be a nice feature to see in a future Audvisor update, though! Overall, the speeches are short and concise, perfect even for a short lunch-break, a stroll outside, or just  a random break for work to relax.

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Easily connect Audvisor to social media

Playing the talks is actually quite easy, as it autoplays everything in a certain list (top rated, new- recommended, experts, topics or your own playlist) and you can easily scroll through various cards in that topic or list in order to quickly select the ones that will suit your current mood. It’s inherently easy and natural, and the easily maneuverable menus and selections make Audvisor very user-friendly. Although I would like to see longer speeches that I can listen to on a commute, for example, the speeches that are at users’ disposal are insightful, educational and motivational. The fact that the audio is of high quality helps with the overall user experience, and so does the easy interface. At the same time, having the possibility of on-screen controls, even on your lockscreen is absolutely great, because it requires less of your involvement when using the app.

The few things that I would suggest to Audvisor developers would be to make these speeches available offline. At the moment, you need an internet connection in order to access the speeches within the app, so keep that in mind. The good thing is that streaming audio is not that bad on your data connection, so you can definitely use that to listen to your favorite speaker while commuting. Still, I would like offline listening implemented in Audvisor in some way or another. At the same time, I would like to see more sorting options for the speeches, such as by length and alphabetically. I would also like to propose longer talks to be included in the portfolio, because sometimes focusing on the same topic for longer can be more relaxing than one might think. Besides these few suggestions, I found Audvisor to be one of my most used apps since I started using it last week.

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Whenever you have five minutes at hand, but not enough time to read a book, play with your kids, hang out with your friends or just are in no mood for socializing, you can use Audvisor to learn more about yourself, your business, your environment, the industry, society, procrastination, productivity, management, entrepreneurship and organizing your own tasks. The app comes in handy even in the shower, but make sure your phone or tablet is in a safe place or at least waterproof. I found myself learning more about how to manage my own time in a couple of days than I did by approaching experienced people about it in a couple of months. Because Audvisor feeds you all that information through people and their speeches, it is easier to concentrate and still manage to get things done in the meantime, without being confused about your tasks. Instead of listening to music that you’ve started getting bored of anyway on the bus, try to use Audvisor and see if you can find speeches that apply to you, personally. I guarantee, that you will find at least 10 that you will like, in the end. Oh, and it’s free.

As part of the editorial team here at Geekreply, John spends a lot of his time making sure each article is up to snuff. That said, he also occasionally pens articles on the latest in Geek culture. From Gaming to Science, expect the latest news fast from John and team.

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Pixel 8 Pro runs Google’s generative AI models

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Rick Osterloh, Google’s SVP of devices and services, says the Pixel 8 Pro will be the first hardware to run Google’s generative AI models.

At an event today, Osterloh said the Pixel 8 Pro’s custom-built Tensor G3 chip, which accelerates AI workloads, can run “distilled” versions of Google’s text- and image-generating models to power image editing and other apps.

Osterloh said, “We’ve worked closely with our research teams across Google to take advantage of their most advanced foundation models and distill them into a version efficient enough to run on our flagship Pixel.”

Google improved Magic Eraser, its photo-editing tool, to remove larger objects and people smudge-free using on-device models. Osterloh claims that this improved Magic Eraser creates new pixels to fill in shot gaps, producing a higher-quality image.

Osterloh says a new on-device model will “intelligently” sharpen and enhance photo details, improving zoom.

On-device processing benefits audio recording. The Pixel 8 Pro’s recording app will soon summarize meeting highlights.

Gboard will use a large language model on the Pixel 8 Pro to power smart replies. Osterloh claims that the upgraded Gboard will provide “higher-quality” reply suggestions and better conversational awareness.

Osterloh said an update in December will add on-device generative AI features except for Magic Eraser, which appears on the Pixel 8 Pro at launch.

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Telegram launches a global self-custodial crypto wallet, excluding the US

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Telegram, with 800 million monthly users, is launching a self-custodial crypto wallet. The move will solidify its presence in the vibrant crypto community that has grown from its chat platform and may attract more people to crypto.

Telegram and TON Foundation announced TON Space, a self-custodial wallet, on Wednesday at Singapore’s Token2049 crypto conference, which draws over 10,000 attendees.

Telegram has a complicated blockchain relationship. After the SEC sued Telegram over a massive initial coin offering, the chat app abandoned its Telegram Open Network (TON) blockchain project in 2020. The Open Network Foundation (TON Foundation), founded by open-source developers and blockchain enthusiasts, supports the development of The Open Network (TON), the blockchain powering a growing number of Telegram applications, including the wallet.

The Open Platform (TOP) and TOP Labs, a venture-building division, created the TON-based wallet.

TON Space will be available to Telegram users worldwide without wallet registration in November. The U.S., which has cracked down on the crypto industry and promoted many crypto apps to geofence users, is currently excluded from the feature.

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Google’s massive antitrust trial begins, with bigger implications

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The Justice Department’s landmark antitrust case against Google began in court today, setting off a months-long trial that could upend the tech world.

At issue is Google’s search business. The Justice Department claims that Google has violated antitrust laws to maintain its search title, but the company claims that it does so by providing a superior product.

The Justice Department sued Google for civil antitrust in late 2020 after a year-long investigation.

“If the government does not enforce the antitrust laws to enable competition, we will lose the next wave of innovation,” said then-Deputy Attorney General Jeffrey A. Rosen. “If that happens, Americans may never see the ‘next Google.’”

A large coalition of state attorneys general filed their own parallel suit against Google, but Judge Amit Mehta ruled that the states did not meet the bar to go to trial with their search ranking complaints.

The search business case against Google is separate from a federal antitrust lawsuit filed earlier this year. The Justice Department claims Google used “anticompetitive, exclusionary, and unlawful means” to neutralize threats to its digital advertising empire in that lawsuit.

Justice Department attorney Kenneth Dintzer set the stakes for the first major tech antitrust trial since Microsoft’s late 1990s reckoning on Tuesday. “This case is about the future of the internet, and whether Google’s search engine will ever face meaningful competition,” Dintzer said.

Beginning the trial, the government focused on Google’s deals with phone makers, most notably Apple, that give its search product top billing on new devices. Dintzer claimed that Google maintains and grows its search engine dominance by paying $10 billion annually for those arrangements.

“This feedback loop, this wheel, has been turning for more than 12 years,” he said. “And it always benefits Google.”

Google lawyer John Schmidtlein refuted that claim, hinting at the company’s legal defense in the coming weeks.

“Users today have more search options and more ways to access information online than ever before,” Schmidtlein said. Google will argue that it competes with Amazon, Expedia, and DoorDash, as well as Microsoft’s Bing search engine.

Google planted the seeds for this defense. According to internal research, Google Senior Vice President Prabhakar Raghavan said last year that more young people are using TikTok to search for information than Google Search.

In our studies, almost 40% of young people don’t use Google Maps or Search to find lunch, Raghavan said. “They use TikTok or Instagram.”

Google will be decided by U.S. District Judge Amit Mehta in the coming months. We’re far from that decision, but the company could be fined heavily or ordered to sell parts of its business.

The trial could change Google’s digital empire if the Justice Department wins. Other tech companies that dominated online markets in the last decade are also watching. If the government fails to hold an iconic Silicon Valley giant accountable, big tech will likely continue its aggressive growth trajectory.

If the Justice Department succeeds, the next decade could be different. The industry-wide reckoning could cripple incumbents and allow upstarts to define the next era of the internet, wresting the future from tech titans.

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