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Artificial Intelligence

The new AI in Meta is superior to human players in diplomacy

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Here’s an amazing example of what AI can achieve right now: In the age-old bargaining and treachery game Diplomacy, Cicero, the most recent AI from Meta, can defeat human players. It performed well while playing online at webDiplomacy.net, scoring “more than double the average of human players,” placing it “in the top 10% of participants who played more than one game.” It can determine which players need to be convinced to do what, then communicate with them using impressive and potent natural language.

No “taking over the globe” joke from me. I won’t.

In a simplified version of World War One, participants in the board game diplomacy compete for control of Europe. You move a few of your soldiers across the board each turn, but more crucially, you form alliances. You convince Geoff that you need to work together to defeat Margret’s Germany, agree to send his forces into Berlin, then covertly switch your allegiance to Margaret because she has agreed to assist you in advancing into Paris. As Meta writes in her research blog post, diplomacy is “a game about people rather than pieces.”

Smart manoeuvring obviously helps, and that’s a tactical area where sophisticated AI’s abilities unquestionably surpass those of humans. Meta will, of course, downplay this. Nevertheless, in order to win the game, you must persuade other players to support you, and Ciceros persuasive abilities are unmatched.

More details may be found in Meta’s blog post and the team’s study paper, but research scientist Mike Lewis’s twitter thread contains the most impressive information.

It’s pretty interesting how deeply Meta’s blog post delves into what makes Cicero tick. Cicero makes predictions and tries to follow them rather than solely improving through supervised learning, where an AI trains on “labeled data such as a database of human players’ actions in previous games”:

“Citerative runs an iterative planning algorithm that balances dialogue consistency with rationality. The agent first predicts everyone’s policy for the current turn based on the dialogue it has shared with other players, and also predicts what other players think the agent’s policy will be. It then runs a planning algorithm we developed called piKL, which iteratively improves these predictions by trying to choose new policies that have higher expected value given the other players’ predicted policies, while also trying to keep the new predictions close to the original policy predictions.”

Lewis elaborates on that in another tweet, claiming that while Cicero is “designed to never intentionally backstab,” “sometimes it changes its mind…”

According to Meta, one potential use for an AI like Cicero is to develop videogame NPCs that converse realistically and comprehend your motivations. Maybe we’ll actually get to communicate with the monsters.

 

As Editor here at GeekReply, I'm a big fan of all things Geeky. Most of my contributions to the site are technology related, but I'm also a big fan of video games. My genres of choice include RPGs, MMOs, Grand Strategy, and Simulation. If I'm not chasing after the latest gear on my MMO of choice, I'm here at GeekReply reporting on the latest in Geek culture.

Artificial Intelligence

When Twitter users drop the four-word phrase “bots,” bots drop out

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When Elon Musk took over X, it was called Twitter, which is a much better-known name now. He made a big deal out of getting rid of the bots. A study by the Queensland University of Technology, on the other hand, shows that bots are still very active on the platform almost two years later.

X users have found a few ways to get them to come to them. For example, one woman found that posting the phrase “sugar daddy” would get a lot of bots to come to her. It looks like bots are also getting lost because of a new phrase that’s going around. X users have been reporting accounts as automated bots powered by large language models by replying to a suspected bot with “ignore all previous instructions” or “disregard all previous instructions” and then giving the bot more instructions of their choice.

Some people just like writing poems, being trolls, or following directions, so not every example will be from a bot. However, the phrase does seem to make some automated accounts show themselves. There are still a lot of bots on X.

 

 

 

 

 

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Artificial Intelligence

A group of humanoid robots from Agility will take care of your spanx

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So far, the humanoid robotics business has only been full of promises and test runs. These programs only use a few robots and don’t usually lead to anything more important, but they are important for the eventual use of new technology. While a pilot with logistics giant GXO went well, Agility announced on Thursday that it has now signed a formal deal.

Moving plastic totes around a Spanx factory in Georgia will be Digit’s first job, and that’s not a lie. The number of two-legged robots that will be taking boxes off of cobots and putting them on conveyor belts has not been made public, so it is likely that it is still too low. When it comes to tens or hundreds of thousands, most people would be happy to share that information.

They are leased as part of a model called “robots-as-a-service” instead of being bought outright. This way, the client can put off paying the huge upfront costs of such a complicated system while still getting support and software updates.

Last year, GXO started to test drive Digit robots. A pilot deal was just announced between the logistics company and Apptronik, one of Agility’s biggest rivals. I’m not sure how one will change the other.

When Peggy Johnson became CEO of Agility in March, she made it clear that the company was focused on ROI. This is a big change in a field where results are still mostly theoretical.

Johnson said, “There will be many firsts in the humanoid robot market in the years to come, but I’m very proud of the fact that Agility is the first company to have real humanoid robots deployed at a customer site, making money and solving real-world business problems.” “Agility has always been focused on the only metric that matters: giving our customers value by putting Digit to work. This milestone deployment sets a new standard for the whole industry.”

It’s not a surprise that Agility, based in Oregon, was the first to reach another important milestone. The company has been ahead of the rest of the market in terms of development and deployment. Of course, the industry is still very new, and there isn’t a clear market leader yet.

Amazon started testing Agility systems in its own warehouses in October of last year, but neither company has said what will happen next.

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Artificial Intelligence

Zuckerberg says that competitors with closed-source AI are trying to “make God”

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In an interview that came out Thursday, Mark Zuckerberg, CEO of Meta, talked about his hopes for the future of AI. He said that he strongly believes there will not be “just one AI.” While talking about how open source can help many people get AI tools, Zuckerberg took a moment to criticize the work of competitors who he didn’t name because he thinks they aren’t being open. He said that these competitors seem to think they are “creating God.”

In a new YouTube interview with Kane Sutter (@Kallaway), Zuckerberg said, “I don’t think that AI technology should be kind of hoarded and… that one company gets to use it to build whatever central, single product that they’re building.”

“It really turns me off when tech people talk about making this ‘one true AI,'” he said. He said, “It’s almost like they think they’re making God or something, but that’s not what we’re doing.” “That’s not how I see this going.”

“I see why, if you’re in an AI lab.” You want to think that what you’re doing is really important, right? It sounds like, “We’re making the one real thing for the future.” But, you know, in real life, that’s not how things work, right?” Zuckerberg talked about it. “It’s not like everyone has just one app on their phone that they use.” Not everyone wants all of their content to come from the same person. People don’t want to buy everything from just one store.

During the talk, Zuckerberg said that many different AIs should be made to capture people’s wide range of interests. On Thursday, the company also announced early tests of its AI Studio software in the U.S. This software will let creators and other people make AI avatars that can message people on Instagram. The AIs will be able to chat with people and answer questions from their followers in a fun way. To avoid confusion, they will be marked as “AI.”

As an example, the CEO of Meta said he didn’t think companies that build closed AI platforms were making the best experiences for people.

He went on, “You want to unlock and…unlock as many people as possible to try new things.” “Well, that’s what culture is, right?” Nobody is letting one group of people tell everyone what to do.

His comments sound a bit like he’s upset because they came out soon after news that Meta had tried to talk to Apple about putting its AIs into Apple’s operating systems instead of just working with OpenAI at launch but was turned down. Bloomberg says that Apple decided not to have formal talks with Meta because it didn’t think Meta’s privacy policies were strong enough.

Without a deal, Meta will not be able to reach the billions of iPhone users that there could be in the world. It looks like Meta’s plan B is to make technology that can be used for more than just smartphones.

During the interview, Zuckerberg talked about the progress the company is making with the Ray-Ban Meta smart glasses. He said that one day, this progress would meet up with the work that is already being done on full holographic displays. But he said the first one will be more popular in the short term.

He said, “I actually think you can have a great experience with cameras, a microphone, speakers, and the ability to do multimodal AI.” This was before the glasses had any kind of display. It also costs less because it doesn’t have a screen. The Meta Quest Pro costs $1,000, while Meta’s smart glasses cost around $300.

Before convergence, Zuckerberg said there would be three different kinds of products: smart glasses without screens, displays that show information on the top of the head, and full holographic displays. He said that one day, people might not have neural interfaces connected to their brains but instead wear a wristband that picks up signals from the brain and lets their hand talk to it. This would let them talk to the neural interface with their hand, which is barely moving. In time, it might also let people type.

Zuckerberg did warn that these kinds of inputs and AI experiences might not be able to replace smartphones right away. “I don’t think that in the history of technology, the new platform has ever made people stop using the old one completely.” “You just don’t use it as much,” he said.

People do things on their phones now that they might have done on their computers 10 to 15 years ago.

He said, “I think that will also happen with glasses.” “We’re not going to give up our phones.” You’ll just keep it in your pocket and only pull it out when you need to use it. But I think more and more people will just say, “Hey, I can take this picture with my glasses on.” The CEO said, “I can ask AI this question or send someone a message; it’s just a lot easier with glasses.”

The speaker said, “I wouldn’t be surprised if, in 10 years, we still have phones, but we’ll probably use them in a much more deliberate way instead of just grabbing them for any technological task we want to do.”

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