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Game prices are relatively cheap in the modern day. I know forking over $60 doesn’t sound very cheap, but considering the prices haven’t adjusted much for inflation since the 90s, I’d say it isn’t all that bad. That and the fact that our current gaming market includes stores like GameStop selling used games at a fraction of the price and online services with insane deals on games like Steam and the online console stores shows how easy it is to be a gamer in the modern day.

It was never this easy nor this cheap to get into the medium in the past. Back in the 90s, game cartridges sold for $50-$60, the value of which has almost doubled in the modern day. Even games that cost $60 ten years ago would cost nearly an extra $10 now as it is. So, as a result, since games still cost the same amount, we’re actually paying less due to inflation. This makes the medium much more affordable, which is something that gamers everywhere would probably want to keep this way.

Despite being so consumer friendly, this inflation mixed with increasing costs in staffing and creating modern video games is harming the producers in the industry. Now, I know that most consumers won’t care but the relationship between the two should be symbiotic for the system to work. By that, I mean producers make quality content for the consumers and said consumers pay them what they deserve for that content.

Since the scale started weighing in the favor of consumers, producers started fighting back with their own methods of keeping it balanced, which many gamers are not fans of at all. Concepts like DLC, micro-transactions, and season passes all exist for game developers to earn extra money on their product. Some of these started off benign enough. Extra content would be added to a game if gamers wanted it and it would have no real impact on gameplay, story, and so on to make the experience fair and enjoyable for all parties involved.

However, these business practices have devolved to the point of taking content from a game that should be there and locking it behind a paywall, creating incredibly unfair pay-to-win situations. A somewhat recent example is the 2015 Star Wars: Battlefront which had very lackluster content at launch and had a $50 season pass, totaling the price up to $110 for the full game. By “full” I mean all the content that was originally supposed to be in the game was there. However, this was done by taking bits and pieces out and selling them back as DLC. While anti-consumer, it brings the price close to what a full, 90s equivalent version of the game would have cost. While it would have been a very different game back then, with an entirely different development process and quality, I’m saying this assuming both would have top-of-the-line visuals for their time like the 2015 version did.

So now that producers have swung the scale way in their favor, I think the best solution is a healthy compromise. Game developers should stop these business practices since they hamper the enjoyment, balance, and quality of the products they deliver. However, I also think gamers should be expected to pay slightly more for their products for developers to safely make their money back on the increasingly expensive venture of game development. I don’t know exactly how much more would be a healthy compromise since I’m not an economist, however I think game prices should at least increase somewhat. A lot of people won’t like this idea, but I think it’s a step in the right direction for fixing the divide between producer and consumer in the gaming industry.

What do you think? Post your input down below.

I spend most of my days working towards my Writing and Rhetoric degree at the University of Central Florida, but I spend a lot of my down time keeping up to date on the best TV, movies, and video games the industry has to offer. Here I put all of that extended time to use discussing each of them in-depth.

Gaming

Amazon’s great Fallout TV show is nominated for 16 Emmys

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Critics and fans alike went crazy for Amazon’s take on the famous role-playing game series Fallout. There were a lot of nominations for 16 Emmy awards, including Best Actor and Outstanding Drama Series. The show was able to reach audiences outside of gamers and got a lot of attention from the industry.

Eurogamer has been keeping track, and now that all the votes are in, Fallout is tied for fifth place with 23 nominations for the 76th Emmy Awards, which are put on by the US Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. With 25, The Bear has the most nominations, followed by True Detective: Night Country with 23, and Shogun with 19.

It shouldn’t be a surprise that Walton Goggins is up for Best Actor for his performance as The Ghoul. Although games will always be our first choice, it’s great that adaptations of games don’t have to be awful, and we can’t wait for the next season of the shows.

Are you surprised by how well Amazon’s version of Fallout has done in the mainstream? Is the curse of movies based on video games finally over? Leave a comment below and let us know.

 

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Gaming

Call of Duty: Black Ops 6 Sets Dates for the Next Multiplayer Beta

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Call of Duty: Black Ops 6 is getting closer and closer, and Activision has announced when players will be able to get their hands on the next game. This means that there will be several chances to try it out before it comes out. If you paid a lot, you might be able to play for more than a week at the end of August and beginning of September.

Call of Duty Early Access will run from Friday, August 30th, to Wednesday, September 4th, as announced on its blog. This is two days after the Call of Duty Next showcase, which is set for August 28th. To play, you must have already bought Black Ops 6.

The open beta is the following weekend, and anyone who wants to can join. The fun will start on Friday, September 6th, and end on Monday, September 9th. The full release is set for October 25th of next month on PS5 and PS4.

How excited are you for the next Call of Duty game? Are you going to play Black Ops 6 in either the Early Access or Open Beta versions? Leave a comment below and let us know.

 

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Gaming

Ten million people play The First Descendant in its first week

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The free-to-play shooter The First Descendant has gotten a lot of attention in its first week. The game’s publisher, Nexon, says that 10 million people have already tried it out.

Insider Gaming pointed out that since there is no cost up front, it’s still too early to tell how many of those players will stick around, but it’s still a big number for a new IP. On Steam alone, it peaked at 264,860 concurrents right after launch and has still managed to break 200,000 in the last 24 hours, so it looks like a lot of people are still really into the game.

It was a “mindless and repetitive grind,” and we gave The First Descendant a 3/10 in our review. Of course, that’s just one opinion; other experts have had different ones. Most people, though, say that the game’s annoying free-to-play model is the worst thing about it.

Are you one of the millions of people who played The First Descendant last week? Are you going to come back for more? Leave a comment below and let us know.

 

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