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Monster Hunter Stories Will Charge into Stores This September

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I will be the first to admit that Monster Hunter is a difficult and time-consuming game. It takes a lot of patience, strategy, a bit of luck, and a metric ton of grinding. Plus, the game’s combat system is extremely punishing. While I love Monster Hunter, for years, I have wanted an easier version my young cousins could enjoy, which is exactly what Monster Hunter Stories tries to be. However, when the game was announced, I was afraid it would remain a Japanese exclusive, but now I can rest easy knowing Nintendo has stated the game will release in America on September 8th.

Nintendo’s announcement was accompanied by a short, two-minute trailer that shows off what Monster Hunter Stories is all about: riding Monster Hunter’s iconic monsters into turn-based RPG battles. While Monster Hunter Stories forgoes the usual art style for a cutesy, anime aesthetic, the new look still makes the monsters appear terrifying and intimidating. Also, the trailer might not hint at the game’s story, but the video shows how the main character meets his (or her) first monster companion, a baby Rathalos already fully capable of flying and breathing fire.

As I’ve already stated, Monster Hunter Stories breaks from the traditional Monster Hunter formula and uses turn-based RPG combat that relies on a rock-paper-scissors-styled system — power attacks overpower technique attacks; speed attacks outpace power attacks, and technique attacks overcome speed attacks. The attacks players use depend on the weapons and monsters they take into battle. Unlike other Monster Hunter games that have up to fourteen weapons, Monster Hunter Stories only has four: the Sword & Shield, Great Sword, Hammer, and Hunting Horn. Furthermore, players can hatch and ride over 100 different monsters, from the living bulldozer Barroth to the not-Super Saiyan Rajang, and they each have their own special attacks and abilities, some of which are used to access special areas of the game’s maps. Monster Hunter Stories also introduces several new monsters, although one of them is just a Legend of Zelda reference. However, even though the battle system has changed, most of Monster Hunter Stories is the standard Monster Hunter experience fans know and love. Players can still gather materials and combine them to create healing items, and gamers still need to hunt and slay powerful monsters to craft powerful armor and weapons.

From what I have found on the Internet, Monster Hunter Stories has received generally favorable reviews and has sold really well over in Japan, but then again, the country is basically in love with Monster Hunter, as evidenced by the Monster Hunter theme park in Universal Studios Japan. As a Monster Hunter fan myself, I look forward to the release of Monster Hunter Stories this September, and of course, I will also buy as many of the game’s amiibos as possible.

All you have to do to get my attention is talk about video games, technology, anime, and/or Dungeons & Dragons - also people in spandex fighting rubber suited monsters.

Gaming

Amazon’s great Fallout TV show is nominated for 16 Emmys

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Critics and fans alike went crazy for Amazon’s take on the famous role-playing game series Fallout. There were a lot of nominations for 16 Emmy awards, including Best Actor and Outstanding Drama Series. The show was able to reach audiences outside of gamers and got a lot of attention from the industry.

Eurogamer has been keeping track, and now that all the votes are in, Fallout is tied for fifth place with 23 nominations for the 76th Emmy Awards, which are put on by the US Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. With 25, The Bear has the most nominations, followed by True Detective: Night Country with 23, and Shogun with 19.

It shouldn’t be a surprise that Walton Goggins is up for Best Actor for his performance as The Ghoul. Although games will always be our first choice, it’s great that adaptations of games don’t have to be awful, and we can’t wait for the next season of the shows.

Are you surprised by how well Amazon’s version of Fallout has done in the mainstream? Is the curse of movies based on video games finally over? Leave a comment below and let us know.

 

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Call of Duty: Black Ops 6 Sets Dates for the Next Multiplayer Beta

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Call of Duty: Black Ops 6 is getting closer and closer, and Activision has announced when players will be able to get their hands on the next game. This means that there will be several chances to try it out before it comes out. If you paid a lot, you might be able to play for more than a week at the end of August and beginning of September.

Call of Duty Early Access will run from Friday, August 30th, to Wednesday, September 4th, as announced on its blog. This is two days after the Call of Duty Next showcase, which is set for August 28th. To play, you must have already bought Black Ops 6.

The open beta is the following weekend, and anyone who wants to can join. The fun will start on Friday, September 6th, and end on Monday, September 9th. The full release is set for October 25th of next month on PS5 and PS4.

How excited are you for the next Call of Duty game? Are you going to play Black Ops 6 in either the Early Access or Open Beta versions? Leave a comment below and let us know.

 

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Ten million people play The First Descendant in its first week

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The free-to-play shooter The First Descendant has gotten a lot of attention in its first week. The game’s publisher, Nexon, says that 10 million people have already tried it out.

Insider Gaming pointed out that since there is no cost up front, it’s still too early to tell how many of those players will stick around, but it’s still a big number for a new IP. On Steam alone, it peaked at 264,860 concurrents right after launch and has still managed to break 200,000 in the last 24 hours, so it looks like a lot of people are still really into the game.

It was a “mindless and repetitive grind,” and we gave The First Descendant a 3/10 in our review. Of course, that’s just one opinion; other experts have had different ones. Most people, though, say that the game’s annoying free-to-play model is the worst thing about it.

Are you one of the millions of people who played The First Descendant last week? Are you going to come back for more? Leave a comment below and let us know.

 

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