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Gaming Journalists MUST be Good at Videogames

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I wrote an opinion piece regarding my thoughts on the current state of gaming journalism. Back when I wrote the piece, I was being too mean-spirited towards my fellow colleagues in journalism across multiple outlets. However, considering that the question about “Should Gaming Journalists be good at Videogames?” still lingers. It’s about time I cleared out a few points once and for all.

I have the feeling this won’t be the last time I talk about a subject like this publicly. I had to wait until the release of Cuphead in order to make some of my points. Don’t get me wrong, I didn’t expect Cuphead to be a bad game because Dean Takahashi was bad at it. I was rather thinking about clearing out some suspicions. Like whether or not the parrying system was well implemented to how accurate and responsive the controls were.

There is one big reason why gaming journalists are expected to be good at video games. Because we are people who the gamers entrust their judgment on in order to decide whether or not a game is good. And many times before, being bad at games can cloud someone’s judgment about the experience as a whole.

Resultado de imagen para Cuphead

Overhype and Frustration lead to Misconception

The gaming community is a great example of this sort of stigma. See, when people aren’t good at the game, they get frustrated. And in their frustration, they tend to write a negative review about it. I remember talking to a Twitter user who didn’t find Cuphead as entertaining or great as me or everyone else found it to be. When I asked why they told me that they didn’t have fun and the game was too frustrating.

As valid as his opinion is, would it be a good idea to say that a game that had a lot of heart and soul put into it is bad because of the frustration? I have talked to other users who said that Cuphead was overhyped in regards to its difficulty.

So, who is right in this regard? The person who says the game was too hard for their liking? Or the person who said that the game was easier than expected? The problem arises when you take the experience the two users have into account.

For example, who is to say that people like me or Isaiah are veteran gamers who have known what they were doing for years? Or people like the Twitter user I talked about wasn’t a more casual gamer than anything else? The difference is, when Youtubers, Gaming Journalists or another sort of participants in modern media overstate a feature in a game. They often give a rather larger expectation of the game as a whole. Which can often lead to disappointment or frustration once these large expectations aren’t met. What’s the golden rule for a journalist?

Resultado de imagen para Crash Bandicoot N.Sane

A Gaming Journalist Must Not Create Misconceptions.

Remember that article I wrote about being too hyped over announcements? There were moments during E3 where gaming press and media praised anti-consumer practices. This is one of the reasons why people had such had expectations for games like No Man’s Sky. We all saw the interviews, the exclusive press releases, and trailers. People got hyped to the point of threatening others who saw a small fault on their precious game they didn’t have yet.

What does this have to do with Games Journalism? Well, to give you an example. Let me take you back to the time where the Crash Bandicoot N. Sane Trilogy was released. A GamesRadar writer decided to write a review about it based on her experiences at the game. Do you remember the headline for which the article became infamous for?

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And this is where the beginning of the issues comes around when it comes to Gaming Journalists and whether or not they are good at games. See, this journalist decided that the game was too hard for them and went for a miserable 7/10 (3.5/5) on her final judgment. It’s still on the “Good” category, but would it really be a deserving note for a game with the amount of polish and care it had? I mean, even with its questionable jump hitboxes, I would’ve given it an 8.

This is a shared issue, not exclusive to Game Journalists.

It’s not like Youtube influences haven’t done a few questionable things either. Nobody really talks about how there are oh-so-many Youtubers defending the horribly cumbersome Storage Capacity problem the Nintendo Switch has. While most people with common sense will agree that this is a big problem for a console with extensive 3rd Party Support. The people in the videos talk about this as “You need to buy an SD, deal with it.” or “The reason people complain is that they don’t have money.”

There are people on Youtube and Journalism alike that defend things such as Microtransactions, DLC or even Broken games. There was one example where a Youtuber named ReviewtechUSA had to talk some sense into a gamer that defended the broken and incomplete release of Street Fighter V. And it wasn’t a pretty argument to watch either.

I mention this problem with Youtubers because some people believe that YouTube users are free of the problems in Games Journalism. This should be enough proof that even that place isn’t free of dumb people who make mistakes every once in a while. However, I think there needs to be a point that Journalists need to understand.

The Gamers Expect Competent Journalists, not eSports players.

Gaming journalists think they aren’t allowed to have fun while playing the games they review. That’s far from the truth in all of the cases. We’re allowed to show how much fun we had playing/failing at the game. However, gamers expect nothing but expertise from us. We’re supposed to be qualified Professionals who know about the games we’re playing.

Yes, I mentioned before that a gaming journalist should also represent the subset audience that plays games casually. However, I think the point should be that Gaming Journalist is expected to be a bit above average at the bare minimum when they play games. How else would gamers be able to entrust their confidence unto them?

I asked for feedback to some of my readers. And they told me that they would trust a person who shows how they play the game more than a person who doesn’t. This is one of the reasons why I started to include gameplay footage on the games I review. With the exception of Jettomero because my graphics card is glitchy.

It’s also one of the reasons why I started the “Gaming Journalist Plays” series. To show that #NotAll journalists are completely helpless at games. You can take a look at it right below.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5k8FMFyt4BU&t=266s

Conclusion: Gaming Journalists need a Renaissance.

Yes, the people at the top are starting to cloud everything for the up and coming next generation of journalists. I have seen enough of my peers agreeing with me on this message more than anything. This whole scandal took a really big toll on me because I had headaches and was forced into taking a small break because I didn’t want to play games anymore.

Gaming Journalism isn’t supposed to be a profession readily available to everyone who knows how to write. This should be a profession that only people who are above average in regards to gaming knowledge can be. Can there be journalists who play badly? In my opinion, no.

I don’t know if I am “Capable” enough for the people who read my articles. I don’t even know if this article is actually correct on the philosophy I believe in. However, I think I can say I’m open on feedback from my fellow readers and fans on Twitter. I’d like to continue this conversation and see how we can make Gaming Journalism evolve like it should.

I always wanted to be a journalist who listens. The Voice of the Unspoken and someone heavily involved in the gaming community. From playing as a leader of a competitive multi-branch team to organizing tournaments for the competitive scene to being involved in a lot of gaming communities. I want to keep moving forward as a journalist.

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The new game from Danganronpa’s developers is being published by Aniplex, a Sony company, but it won’t be coming out on PS5

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The upcoming game from the creators of the Danganronpa series has found a publisher in Sony subsidiary Aniplex. However, it’s worth noting that it won’t be initially released on the PS5. It is highly likely that The Hundred Line: Last Defense Academy will be released on Sony’s system at a later date, just like Master Detective Archives: Rain Code in October. However, the development team is currently focusing on prioritizing the release of their latest title on the Nintendo Switch and PC.

Described as a strategy game, the title allows players to step into the shoes of teenager Takumi Sumino, who resides in the perpetually secure Tokyo Residential Complex. When monsters suddenly unleash chaos upon the town, Takumi finds himself thrust into the Last Defense Academy. His mission? To protect the school alongside 14 other students for a grueling 100 days.

As one would anticipate, alongside the strategic gameplay, it is crucial to foster strong relationships with your comrades. Moreover, the outcome of the game can vary greatly, with a staggering 100 possible endings contingent upon the choices you make. We will reach out to Aniplex to inquire about the possibility of a PS5 port. However, it is important to note that Aniplex operates independently from PlayStation, as it falls under the Sony Music umbrella.

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The photo mode in Alan Wake 2 on PS5 doesn’t hold many surprises

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Most new games these days have some kind of photography feature, so it’s hard to remember a time before Photo Modes. Some developers don’t think it’s important for players to be able to take pictures right away, so the feature is added later. One great example of this is Alan Wake 2, which now has Photo Mode thanks to a new update that is now available.

If you look at the trailer above, you can see that you can really get creative with your photos by adding cool borders, overlays, and filters. We always like photo modes, where you can move different lights around in the scene. As the video shows, Remedy really lets you use your imagination with the different colors and lighting props.

 

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Before the DLC comes out, the Big Elden Ring update adds new features and fixes the game’s balance

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There will be an update for Elden Ring next week that sounds pretty important. The patch will come out on June 20, right before Shadow of the Erdtree goes live on June 21. “New features” and “balance adjustments” are what FromSoftware says the update will have.

Luckily, the developer went on to give more information. We went ahead and put them all together in the patch notes below:

New parts of inventory:

  • Items that were just gained will have a “!” next to them
  • There is now a new tab called “Recent Items” that lets you look at items that you just got

What’s new in Summoning Pool?

  • Now, active summoning pools will follow you to NG+
  • The newly added Map Functions Menu now lets you turn on and off individual summoning pools
  • When you use the Small Golden Effigy, it will only choose active Summoning Pools

All new hairstyles:

  • The game now has five more hairstyles to choose from. You can choose them when you make your character, with the Clouded Mirror Stand, or with Rennala’s Rebirth feature.
    FromSoftware also says that the patch will have extra features that aren’t listed here. I hope they’re a pleasant surprise!

Would you like to see any of these changes made? Are you still excited about Shadow of the Erdtree? Get ready by reading the comments below.

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